| Read Time: 2 minutes | Personal Injury

When Do I Need a Personal Injury Attorney?

Life is never really the same when you or someone you love suffers a personal injury. You may be forced to adopt dramatic changes to even performing the most mundane tasks. The National Center for Health Statistics reports that around 31 million people each year receive medical treatment due to injury. Many people wonder when or if they should contact a personal injury attorney in Bakersfield. Young Wooldridge, LLP has served our surrounding communities since 1939, and we have the seasoned experience to help you in the event of an accident. What is Involved in CA Personal Injury Law? The personal injury laws of California provide legal recourse for those suffering personal injuries from the actions or negligence of another party or parties. Young Wooldridge, LLP can assist you with filing a claim with the courts to pursue compensation. Our attorneys have forged strong relationships throughout our community with legal and medical professionals. These partnerships allow us to formulate the best possible defense for your claim. When you need a talented, experienced personal injury attorney in Bakersfield, Young Wooldridge, LLP can provide the legal assistance you need for the following types of accidents: Car Accidents Construction/Industrial/Oil Field Accidents Burn Accidents Dangerous and Defective Products Dog Bites Motorcycle Accidents Premises Liability Traumatic Brain Injuries Truck Accidents Wrongful Death If you or a loved one have suffered a personal injury, contact the attorneys at Young Wooldridge, LLP by phone or online to schedule a confidential consultation. How Can Young Wooldridge, LLP Help? Every accident is as unique as the Bakersfield resident who suffers an injury. Due to these differences, and the many complexities that can be present, California personal injury laws can be complicated. You need a seasoned, knowledgeable personal injury attorney to defend your rights and fight to obtain you the compensation you deserve. In cases where one of the family’s providers becomes injured and unable to work, it is especially important that your attorney be able to provide efficient and effective negotiation and litigation on behalf of your claim for compensation.  Call or send an online message to Young Wooldridge, LLP today if you or a loved one have been injured in an accident due to another party’s negligence.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Business Law

COVID-19 and Public Meetings: An Update on the Brown Act Requirements

 On March 17, 2020, Governor Newsom issued a new Executive Order that relaxed additional requirements of the Brown Act. Water Law attorney Brett Stroud prepared the following update for our clients and those who conduct business at public meetings:  Yesterday, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-29-20 (“March 17 Order”), which altered some of the provisions of his previous Executive Order N-25-20 (“March 12 Order”), including his relaxation of certain Brown Act requirements. The March 17 Order differs from the March 12 Order in one significant respect: it removes the requirement that an agency provides a publicly accessible location from which members of the public can observe the meeting and provide public comment.  Instead, an agency may hold the meeting entirely by teleconference, provided it also “implements a procedure for receiving and swiftly resolving requests for reasonable modification or accommodation from individuals with disabilities, consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act and resolving any doubt whatsoever in favor of accessibility” and “advertise that procedure each time notice is given of the means by which members of the public may observe the meeting and offer public comment.” In short, the March 17 Order permits an agency “to hold public meetings via teleconferencing and to make public meetings accessible telephonically or otherwise electronically to all members of the public.”  The agency must provide notice within the usual timeframe, provide a method for members of the public to offer public comment during the teleconference meeting, and provide a procedure for members of the public to request accommodations based on disability. Like the March 12 Order, the March 17 Order applies specifically “during the period in which state or local public officials impose or recommend measures to promote social distancing, including but not limited to limitations on public events.”  On March 16, the California Department of Public Health issued updated guidance relative to public gatherings.  That guidance indicates that “all gatherings should be postponed or canceled.” If you have any questions or would like specific advice on applying the March 17 Order for your agency, please feel free to contact an attorney in our Water and Special Districts Department.  In particular, if you plan to hold a meeting by teleconference, please contact us for assistance in preparing your agenda.  We can be reached by phone at 661-327-9661.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Business Law

COVID-19 and Public Meetings: Brown Act Implication of Executive Order N-25-20

On March 12, 2020, Governor Newsom issued an executive order relaxing certain requirements of the Brown Act and the Bagley-Keene Act, affecting public meetings. Water Law attorney Brett Stroud prepared the following information: On March 12, 2020, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-25-20 (“Order”), exercising his emergency powers under Government Code sections 8567, 8571, and 8572.  The Governor has the authority to “suspend any regulatory statute, or statute prescribing the procedure for conduct of state business … where the Governor determines and declares that strict compliance … would in any way prevent, hinder, or delay the mitigation of the effects of the emergency.”  (Gov. Code, § 8571.)  Exercising that power, Governor Newsom has temporarily relaxed certain requirements of the Brown Act and the Bagley-Keene Act. Ordinarily, an agency must post notice of a teleconference meeting at all locations from which any board member will participate, allow the public to attend and offer public comment at any of those locations, and have at least one board member physically present at each location.  Furthermore, a quorum of the Board must participate from locations within the agency’s boundaries.  Those requirements are suspended by section 11 of the Order, and agencies are permitted “to hold public meetings via teleconferencing and to make public meetings accessible telephonically or otherwise electronically to all members of the public.”  The agency must provide notice within the usual timeframe and must provide “at least one publicly accessible location from which members of the public shall have the right to observe and offer public comment.” It should be noted that the authorization applies specifically “during the period in which state or local public officials impose or recommend measures to promote social distancing, including but not limited to limitations on public events.”  The California Department of Public Health has issued such guidance relative to public gatherings. The guidance requires cancellation or postponement of gatherings larger than 250 persons.  Smaller gatherings should only be held if the venue allows for 6 feet of distance between persons.  If individuals at higher risk may be present, gatherings should be limited to 10 individuals.  In the public agency meeting context, all members of the public are permitted to attend, including those at higher risk, and the agency cannot limit attendance to 10 individuals. If you have any questions or would like specific advice on applying this Order for your agency, please feel free to contact an attorney in our Water and Special Districts Department. We can be reached by phone at 661-327-9661.  

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